10 Reasons Why Kids Brought Up in Agriculture Make the Best Employees

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  Kids involved in agriculture are truly one of a kind. They possess a unique skill set unlike anyone else. For the record, there are more than 10 reasons why you should hire an ag kid, but here are some of the best and most important reasons why ag kids make the best employees.

  1. They understand the importance of being on time.

For Ag kids they know that time is of the essence and wasting daylight is not an option. Even if your five minutes late feeding that show lamb, it will notice. You can expect us to be 15 minutes early because that’s what we’ve learned from our time at the barn.

  1. Respect is something they value more than anything.

They have worked hard in the show ring to be well-respected so they understand that respect isn’t something that’s given it’s EARNED. FFA taught them to, “…believe in leadership from ourselves and respect from others.”

  1. A hard day’s work is the only way to work.

They are up to feed before they go to school and after Judging practice they’re out in the field until ten working their stock so they are show ready. Most people know a 9 to 5 job, not kids raised in a barn, they know a 5 to 9 job and will do it with 110%.

  1. They can speak their mind eloquently.

Between preparing a speech for National 4-H Congress or practicing oral reasons for the next Livestock Judging contest, these kids know what they want to say, the importance of what they are saying, and how to deliver it. You won’t have to worry about them talking to customers or clients. In fact, you are going to want them to.

  1. They are willing to do the dirty work.

Whether they had to muck out the pig pen or clean out the underneath of a lawnmower they understand that it has to be done. It may not be the most fun job in the world but they will get it done with a great attitude. They know that no person is too good for any job, big or small.

  1. You won’t meet someone more driven then they are.

Ag kids strive for greatness every single day. They are willing to get up at three for the latest trip and on top of it miss prom to compete just so they can be better than they were the last contest. Competing in multiple Career Development Events, working a show hog to be the best showman, being the star athlete on the football team and maintaining a 4.0 GPA is what they strive for and they know they can’t do it alone. They have had a support system of family, Ag teachers and advisors, 4-H leaders, and Grange members helping them along the way.

  1. Their record keeping skills are on point.

Ag kids have kept records since they were little. 4-H records and project books where they kept track of their project’s value and showed their skills on paper, then on to SAE projects through AET where everything was digitalized and had records the equivalent of a successful business. Many of their awards and degrees depended on quality records so making sure your business has records worth winning state convention won’t be a problem.

  1. You’ll be amazed by their ability to remember things.

On any given moment you could ask an Ag kid what they feed their show steer and they’ll be able to tell you, what percent crude protein it contains, the main ingredients, and how much their steer gets twice a day, all without missing a beat. They have to know this stuff in the event their judge in the ring wants to know. Or go ahead and ask them about the FFA Creed after having to recite ALL five paragraphs, I am sure they still can tell you the third line in the second paragraph pretty easily.

  1. They have experience in a variety of different areas.

Ag class has taught them a wide assortment of skills from ag business to rebuilding an engine, pulling a calf to crop science and everything in-between. They’ve done it all! Although they might be the youngest person applying for the job they know how to do just about everything agriculture and what they don’t know they can learn very quickly.

  1. You will be able to appreciate how polite they are.

The way they were raised its, “Yes ma’am, No sir, Can I help you with that, or Let me grab that door for you.”  They know that they represent more than themselves; they represent their families, ag teachers and an entire industry.

-Karly Hanson

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